African Tribal Mask

GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE


GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE

GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE   GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE

Welcome To The Premier Place For Serious Collectors of Fine Authentic African Tribal Art. Over 10 Years Online Serving Thousands of Satisfied Customers.

Offering the Finest Quality Sub-Saharan African Art. Superb African Bamana Tji-Wara Crest Mask Male Segou Region.

Inches: Height: 41 Inches / Sculpture Only Not Including Stand and Draping Fiber Centimeters: Height: 104 Centimeters. Measurements With Stand: 57.5 Inches / 146 Centimeters Material: Wood, Cloth, Fiber, Basket, Shells, Beads Estimated Age: Early Mid 20th Century Condition: Good Remarks: Traditional stylized headdress zoomorphic antelope form aged surface dark patina male form. Documentation of Authenticity / Any Available Provenance Will Be Included With This Piece. Wood deterioration, scrapes and chips, worn areas, age cracks, lost to some attribute, overall condition good. Thank you and please view my other items.

The Bambara people, also called Bamana, form the largest ethnic group within Mali and occupy the central part of the country, in an area of savannah. They live principally from agriculture, with some subsidiary cattle rearing in the northern part of their territory. The Bambara people are predominantly animists, although recently the Muslim faith has been spreading among them.

The Bambara kingdom was founded in the 17th century and reached its pinnacle between 176o, and 1787 during the reign of N'golo Diarra. N'golo Diarra is credited with conquering the Peul people and in turn claimed the cities of Dienne and Timbuktu. However, during the 19th century, the kingdom began to decline and ultimately fell to the French when they arrived in 1892. For the most part, Bambara society is structured around six male societies, known as the Dyow sing.

The stylistic variations in Bambara art are extreme sculptures, masks and headdresses display either stylized or realistic features, and either weathered or encrusted patinas. Until quite recently, the function of Bambara pieces was shrouded in mystery, but in the last twenty years field studies have revealed that certain types of figures and headdresses were associated with a number of the societies that structure Bambara life. During the 1970s a group of approximately twenty figures, masks and TjiWara headdresses belonging to the so-called'Segou style' were identified. The style is distinct and recognizable by its typical flat faces, arrow-shaped noses, all-over body triangular scarifications and, on the figures, splayed hands.

Bambara carvers have established a reputation for the zoomorphic headdresses worn by Tji-Wara society members. Although they are all different, they all display a highly abstract body, often incorporating a zig-zag motif, which represents the sun's course from east to west, and a head with two large horns. Bambara members of the Tji-Wara society wear the headdress while dancing in their fields at sowing time, hoping to increase the crop yield. Painter Fred Uhlman words - Most of the artists I admired, Picasso, Modigliani, Deraini, to mention only a few, had collected African art and had been profoundly influenced by it. Shortly afterwards I bought the Baule Fetish and the Baule bobbin which are still two of the finest pieces in my collection. It is easy to see why I bought them and why from that moment I have never stopped collecting. The head of the bobbin or heddle - pulley which is after all only a functional object for the purpose of weaving seemed to me then and today as beautiful as a Greek goddess. The fetish moved me as deeply as the bobbin by its silent tragic dignity and its air of profound meditation. AUTHENTICITY AND CONDITION OF ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO THEIR DESCRIPTION AND PICTURES. PACKING FRAGILE ART ITEM NEEDS CAREFUL ATTENTION AND WILL NEVER BE FAST, BUT WE DO OUT BEST TO MAKE SURE IT WILL ARRIVE FOR YOU SAFELY. The item "GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE" is in sale since Friday, May 4, 2018. This item is in the category "Antiques\Ethnographic\African\Other African Antiques". The seller is "gothamgallery" and is located in Huntersville, North Carolina. This item can be shipped worldwide.
GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE   GothamGallery Fine African Art Mali Bamana Chi-Wara Tribal Crest Mask EE